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Author: Paula Vélez
Date:  
To: Bricolabs
Subject: Re: [Bricolabs] Research study on repair/reuse - recruiting participants in the UK
hello Felipe and all bricos,

here is a repair issue made by some friends that perhaps you will like for
your project.

http://www.continentcontinent.cc/index.php/continent/issue/view/27

take care all,

paula

El lun., 20 abr. 2020 a las 13:56, Felipe Schmidt Fonseca (<
felipefonseca@???>) escribió:

> Thanks Sonja... These kinds of stories of reuse are great examples of
> where I’m trying to get. The question remains how to scale these
> initiatives up with policies/facilities/methodologies so that the
> proportion of reused materials increases.
>
> On 17 Apr 2020, at 23:45, Sonja van Kerkhoff <sonjavank@???>
> wrote:
>
> Reading about James and Lisa's projects reminded me of a project Sen + I
> did in new zealand as part of a 2 month artist residency.
> We took in broken furniture and to turn it into other things which were
> then traded or given away. One of the these was a plank of oak from a
> church in the Netherlands which the elderly woman valued but didn't know
> what to do with it. So we built it into a throne like chair and gave it
> back to her. Here are are few photos of other things made.
> https://sensonja.wordpress.com/2012/12/
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Brico <brico-bounces@???> on behalf of James Wallbank <
> james@???>
> *Sent:* 17 April 2020 12:22
> *To:* brico@??? <brico@???>
> *Subject:* Re: [Bricolabs] Research study on repair/reuse - recruiting
> participants in the UK
>
> Hi Felipe,
>
> Delighted to participate if we can. Repair and reuse is what me and my
> wife Lisa do just about every day. One of our shop's core activities is
> reusing or upcycling old things.
>
> We purchase or acquire old things like antiques, and often they are
> broken or simply out of fashion. We then assess how we can repair or
> transform them in a way that makes value sense - so we spend as little
> time as possible, but we also get a result as nice (and as high value!)
> as possible. Lisa has a very successful line in junk art, and we also
> make and repair lamps and decorative items. We also have customers bring
> us stuff for repair or transformation.
>
> (A couple of years ago a married couple brought us a stainless steel
> frame, with screws and pins. It was used to hold their son's leg
> together when he had a bad motorcycle accident. He had to wear it for
> more than a year. After his leg was healed, his mother kept the parts.
> We made it into a bedside lamp that she gave him as a gift!)
>
> We've come to many provisional conclusions about the best items to
> transform, what to transform them into, and how. A crucial issue is what
> people will pay for. Now I know this doesn't sound very "Bricolabs" -
> but I believe that it is. Only when we can understand how people value
> (literally - value!) objects can we hope to influence mass behaviour.
> Key appears to be the emotional attachment that people have to an item.
> They're much more keen to pay to repair an item that, for example, they
> inherited from a loved family member, than they will an item that they
> simply bought.
>
> At the same time, people acknowledge when they have no use for an item -
> however nostalgic it is, if they can't actually make it work in their
> lives, they're more keen to discard it. So there's a combination of
> practicality and nostalgia, or story, that makes for the highest value,
> and things people really want to repair and retain.
>
> Hope this helps. Maybe get in touch off-list if you'd like to talk about
> this more?
>
> All the best,
>
> James
> =====
>
> On 16/04/2020 17:15, Felipe Schmidt Fonseca wrote:
> > Hey all,
> >
> > In developing my research project here in Dundee, I will be conducting
> two studies, and would love if any of you could help me find suitable
> participants for either (or both). The only restriction is that they need
> to be adults and based in the UK. They are:
> >
> > - Repair Journey: participants will be asked to pick one object that is
> either broken, malfunctioning or inadequate, and spend two weeks working on
> a diary of that object as they try to repair, repurpose or make it valuable
> in any sense. It can be an object they currently have, or even an
> experience they had in the past. The main idea is to explore how value is
> assessed, what are the obstacles and discoveries, and how could cities help
> society make a better use of available materials. No experience required ;)
> >
> > - Ecosystem Mapping: I want to interview people actively engaged with
> different settings operating in the fields of reuse, repair, transformation
> of matter. Repair shops, tailors, waste collection, sorting of recyclables,
> makerspaces, hardware stores, and so on. Any suggestions are welcome.
> >
> > Thanks everyone for your time on that.
> >
> >
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